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You've heard these chord progressions in many songs.

Tonic                               2 - 5                        Cycle 5               Turnarounds           
Suspensions                Ascending             Descending
Line cliches                     Pivotal                

I use the key of C to provide examples.  (A is the relative minor of C)

Tonic

Every mode has defining chord progressions that only occur in that mode.  See Theory.  They define the key.  

Ionian Major   

major scale
Sing the solfege syllables while you listen to a Ionian major scale.

Defining: 
The most obvious characteristic is the Vdom7 (or V7)

I   IV   Vdom7    =    C    F    Gdom7       
ii   V7  I          =    Dm    G7     C
I    vi   ii   V7      =    C     Am     Dm     G7

If you're confused see: beginners theory or chord building or modes

Single tonic   
I   =    C    Cmaj7    C6     Cdom7 (blues)

Common:

I   IV   V    =    C    F    G


Blues (chromatic, non scale tones)
I7   IV7   V7   =   Cdom7    Fdom7    Gdom7

Aeolian Minor    

minor mode Aeolian solfege
Sing the solfege syllables while you listen to a Aeolian minor scale.

Aeolian: mode 6 - chord 6 
In the key of C, Aeolian starts on vi, or A  

Defining
i   iv   v    =   Am   Dm    Em
i   bVI   bVII    =    Am    F    G

If you're confused see: beginners theory or chord building or modes

Single tonic:
i   =   Am   Am(M7)   Am6   Am7

Common:
i   iv   v   =   Am    Dm    Em
i7  iv7   v7    =    Am7  Dm7  Em7 

Dorian minor  

Mode 2   Chord 2    (In the key of C, Dorian starts on ii, or D  

Defining:
i   ii    =    Dm   Em    
i   IV7  =    Dm   G7        
i   bVII  IV7   =    Dm   A   G7  

Phrygian minor   

(mode 3   chord 3)   It starts on iii, or E

Defining:
i   bII    =   Em   F  

Lydian Major   

 (mode 4    chord 4)    It starts on IV, or F

Defining:
I   II   =    F     G
I   II7   =    F    G7

Mixolydian Major  

  (mode 5   chord 5)   It starts on V, or G

Defining:
I   bVII  IV    =     G    F    C
I   bVII     =       G     F 

Locrian diminished    

 (mode 7     chord 7)    It starts on 7, or B

Defining:
i  diminished    =    B diminished

2 - 5

Major:
ii  V7   =   Dm   G7
     
Blues:
II7  V7   =    D7    G7     Dominant and harsh.       

Cycle 5

These cycle 5's can be repeated over and over.  The last time through they resolve to the 1 chord

Major:

iii   vi   ii   V7     =     Em    Am    Dm    G7
minor:
v   i   iv   bVII        

Major:

iii   VI7   ii   V7   =    Em    A7    Dm    G7

The VI7 is a replacement for the standard vi.  Reverse the sequence and get   ii  V7   iii   VI7

Blues:
III7     VI7     II7     V7         Dominant and harsh (blues)     E7   A7  D7   G7

Turnarounds

These are common in blues music at the end of a section, or song.
They can also be used to "escape" minor.
V7  wants to resolve to the 1 chord

Major:

I    vi    IV    V7  =    C   Am   F  G7

minor:
bIII   i   bVI   bVII7    
This often appears at the start of songs.


Major:

I   vi     ii   V7   =     C   Am   Dm   G7

minor:
bIII   i   iv   bVII7       
This is used at the end of a section to get back to the tonic (1 chord)
Use with a Cycle V to build an intro.


Major:    The biii keeps the progression moving
iii   biii   ii     V7       
minor:
v   bv   iv   bVII7
     


minor:
i    vi7(b5)   ii7(b5)  V7    =      Am     F#7(b5)      B7(b5)      (V7 replaces v7,  vi7(b5) replaces bVI)


Suspension

These sequences create motion.


NEEDS FINISHED



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